The modality type with the highest score indicates your preferred learning channel. The higher the score, the stronger the preference. If you have relatively high scores in two or more sections, you probably have more than one strength. If the scores in the sections are roughly equal, you probably do not have a preferred learning channel; you are a multi-sensory learner.

The modality type with the highest score indicates your preferred learning channel. The higher the score, the stronger the preference. If you have relatively high scores in two or more sections, you probably have more than one strength. If the scores in the sections are roughly equal, you probably do not have a preferred learning channel; you are a multi-sensory learner.

The following table summarizes the observable characteristic indicative of the three learning styles. It provides an informal means of assessing your preferred approach to learning.

MODALITY VISUAL AUDITORY KINESTHETIC (Hands-on)
PREFERRED LEARNING STYLE Learns by seeing or watching demonstrations Learns through verbal instructions from self or others. Learns by doing and direct involvement.
SPELLING Recognizes words by sight; relies on configurations of words. Uses a phonics approach has auditory word attack skills. Often is a poor speller; writes words to determine if they “feel” right.
READING Likes description; sometimes stops reading to stare into space and imagine scene; intense concentration. Enjoys dialogue and plays; avoids lengthy descriptions; unaware of illustrations; moves lips or sub-vocalizes. Prefers stories where action occurs early; fidgets while reading; not an avid reader.
HANDWRITING Tends to be a good, particularly when young; spacing and size are good; appearance is important. Has more difficulty learning in initial stages; tends to write lightly. Good initially, but deteriorates when space becomes smaller; pushes harder on writing instrument.
MEMORY Remember faces, but forgets names; writes things down; takes notes. Remembers names, but forgets faces; remembers by auditory repetition. Remembers best what was done, but not what was seen or talked about.
IMAGERY Vivid imagination; thinks in pictures; visualizes in detail. Sub-vocalizes; imagines things in sounds; details are less important. Imagery not important; images that do occur are accompanied by movement.
DISTRACTABILITY Unaware of sounds; distracted by movement Easily distracted by sounds. Not attentive to visual or auditory presentation so may seem distracted.
PROBLEM SOLVING Deliberate; plans in advance; organizes thoughts by writing them; lists problems. Talks problems out; tries solutions verbally or sub-vocally; talks self through problems. Attacks problem physically; impulsive; often selects solution involving greatest activity.
RESPONSE TO PERIODS OF INACTIVITY Stares or doodles; finds something. Hums, talks to self, or talks to others. Fidgets or finds reasons to move.
RESPONSE TO NEW SITUATIONS Looks around or examines structure. Talks about situation; discusses pros and cons of what to do. Tries things out; touches, feels or manipulates.
by O’Brien (1985)

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